Green Tea Really Does Have Health Benefits, Says Study

A new study states that green tea cuts obesity and a number of inflammatory biomarkers linked with poor health.

The benefits appear to stem from improved gut health, including more beneficial microbes in the intestines of the mice and less permeability in the intestinal wall.

Read: Is Gut Health Influencing Mental Health

“This study provides evidence that green tea encourages the growth of good gut bacteria, and that leads to a series of benefits that significantly lower the risk of obesity,” said Richard Bruno, the study’s Lead Author and Professor of Human Nutrition at The Ohio State University.

Green tea has a rich history in Asian countries and has been increasingly embraced in the West, in part for its potential health benefits.

Catechins, anti-inflammatory polyphenols found in green tea, have been linked to anti-cancer activity and lower risk of heart and liver disease.

The researchers also found that the green tea appeared to contribute to a healthier microbial community in the guts of the mice fed a high-fat diet.

Mice fed the normal, or low-fat, diet supplemented with green tea also had benefits including reduced weight gain and lower endotoxin levels and markers of leaky gut, but these were relatively modest compared with the effects seen in mice fed the high-fat diet.

Green tea consumption in the experiment would be equivalent to about 10 cups of green tea throughout the day for a person, Bruno said.

“It might seem like a lot of tea, but it’s not highly unusual in certain parts of the world,” he said.

Read more: Are You Drinking Enough Water? Your Gut Knows the Answer

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: